Tag Archives: healthy living

6 Unusual Habits of Exceptionally Creative People

mschoice-blog
Hello!
I’m Ms. Choice and I’m here to provide information and assist in promoting and implementing wellness and healthier snacking at work sites and schools. INC has collected 6 unusual habits of exceptionally creative people, see below:

6 Unusual Habits of Exceptionally Creative People

I expend a huge amount of my time and energy writing books and articles and working to keep my company innovative. I’ve developed an obsession with some of history’s most creative minds in the hope that I might learn some tricks to expand my creative productivity.

Some of the things I’ve learned are more useful than others, and some are simply too weird to try.

Steve Jobs, for example, routinely sat on toilets, and would dangle his bare feet in the water, while he came up with new ideas, and Yoshiro Nakamatsu (inventor of the floppy disk) would dive deep underwater until his brain was deprived of oxygen, and then write his ideas on an underwater sticky pad.

Weird ideas aside, I’ve developed a pretty good understanding of the habits of some of history’s most creative minds. There’s enough commonality between different people that I’ve distilled their habits into strategies that anyone can follow.

Six of these strategies stand out because they have the power to change the way you think about creativity. Give them a try, and you’ll reach new levels of creative productivity.

1. Wake Up Early

Not all creative minds are morning people. Franz Kafka routinely stayed up all night writing, and William Styron (author of Sophie’s Choice, among other bestsellers) woke up at noon every day and considered his “morning” routine to be staying in bed for another hour to think.

However, early risers make up the clear majority of creative thinkers. The list of creative early risers ranges from Benjamin Franklin to Howard Schultz to Ernest Hemingway, though they didn’t all wake up early for the same reasons. Franklin woke up early to plan out his day, while Schultz uses the time to send motivational emails to his employees. For many creative people, waking up early is a way to avoid distractions. Hemingway woke up at 5 a.m. every day to begin writing. He said, “There is no one to disturb you, and it is cool and cold and you come to your work and warm as you write.”

The trick to making getting up early stick is to do it every day and avoid naps–no matter how tired you feel. Eventually, you will start going to bed earlier to make up for the lost sleep. This can make for a couple of groggy days at first, but you’ll adjust quickly, and before you know it, you’ll join the ranks of creative early risers.

2. Exercise Frequently

There’s plenty of evidence pointing to the benefits of exercise for creativity. Feeling good physically gets you in the right mood to focus and be productive. Exercise also forces you to have disconnected time (it’s tough to text or email while working out), and this allows you to reflect on whatever it is you’re working on. In a Stanford study, 90 percent of people were more creative after they exercised.

It’s no surprise that so many creative and successful people built exercise into their daily routines. Kurt Vonnegut took walks into the nearby town, swam laps, and did pushups and sit-ups, Richard Branson runs every morning, and composers Beethoven and Tchaikovsky both walked daily.

3. Stick to a Strict Schedule

It’s a common misconception that in order to be creative, one must live life on a whim with no structure and no sense of need to do anything, but the habits of highly successful and creative people suggest otherwise. In fact, most creative minds schedule their days rigorously. Psychologist William James described the impact of a schedule on creativity, saying that only by having a schedule can we “free our minds to advance to really interesting fields of action.”

Read full article here –>

 

Nestle Raises the Bar on Sustainability

mschoice-blog
Hello!
I’m Ms. Choice and I’m here to provide information and assist in promoting and implementing wellness and healthier snacking at work sites and schools. Take a look at an article from KitKat, below:

 

KitKat makes global pledge to use only sustainably sourced cocoa.

Cocoa Plan
KitKat is the first global chocolate brand to announce that it will use only sustainably sourced cocoa to manufacture all of its products, and will do so from the first quarter of 2016.The brand already uses only sustainably sourced cocoa, accredited by independent third-party bodies, in products sold in certain markets, but this new announcement extends the practice worldwide, including the United States.Sandra Martinez, Head of Confectionery for Nestlé, said: “We’re delighted to be a flag bearer for the industry, as the first global chocolate brand to announce such a move.“Sustainable cocoa sourcing helps safeguard the livelihoods of farming communities and delivers higher quality cocoa beans. This announcement will only strengthen consumer trust in KitKat as a responsible brand.”The initiative, which coincides with KitKat’s 80th birthday, is part of Nestlé’s commitment to source 150,000 tonnes of sustainably produced cocoa by 2017 via the Nestlé Cocoa Plan.The Nestlé Cocoa Plan aims to improve the lives of cocoa farming communities and the quality of the cocoa Nestlé purchases.As KitKat marks eight decades since its launch, learn more about how ‘moment marketing’ helped this iconic brand conquer the digital world.

full article here

10 Simple Rules For A Healthy Life

mschoice-blog
Hello!
With modern day stressors, it can be hard to maintain a balanced lifestyle. Here are some great guidelines from Huffington Post on coming back to your center…and whenever chocolate is a positive suggestion, you know I am on board!

Health Tips: 10 Simple Rules For A Healthy Life
09/03/2012 9:47 am EDT

By Jené Luciani for Shape.com

These days, it takes more than an apple a day to keep the doctor away. With hectic lifestyles and bad habits like skipping sleep, excess alcohol consumption and sky-high stress levels, it’s harder than ever for most people to stay fit and healthy, much less take extra steps to reduce your risk of diseases like cancer, stroke and heart disease.

Flickr: shimelle

3. Eat Chocolate
Surprised by this rule? Believe it or not, you can enjoy the foods you like — any and all of them, in moderation.”The key to any good diet is to allow yourself a treat every once in a while. If you eat ice cream every day, it doesn’t taste nearly as good as if you eat it at the end of the week as a reward for an entire week of healthy eating!”

Coffee and a Healthy Heart

Love your cup o’ joe in the morning? So do we! This study from Vending Market Watch suggests certain health benefits associated with your morning fix:

Study: 3 To 5 Cups Of Coffee Per Day May Reduce
Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Risk By Up To 21%
JUN 24, 2015

 

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24 June, 2015 Drinking 3-5 cups of coffee per day could cut an individual’s cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality risk by up to 21%, according to research highlighted in a EuroPRevent session report published by the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC), a not-for-profit organization devoted to the study and disclosure of science related to coffee and health1.

The finding is significant given that coronary heart disease and stroke remain the primary cause of death across Europe, responsible for 51% of all deaths in women and 42% of all deaths in men.2  Over four million people die from CVD annually in Europe and overall, CVD is estimated to cost the EU economy €196 billion every year.3

The ISIC session report highlights the research presented at a Satellite Symposium held during the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation’s 2015 congress in Lisbon, Portugal, on the subject of ‘Coffee and CVD Mortality’. Leading researchers in this field presented on the role of lifestyle factors in CVD mortality risk reduction, the epidemiological evidence on coffee and CVD mortality, and the conclusions from meta-analyses on coffee and CVD mortality.

The lowest CVD mortality risk is seen at an intake of approximately 3 cups of coffee per day, with a percentage risk reduction of up to 21%.1

Two 2014 meta-analyses suggest an association between coffee consumption and CVD risk, proposing a ‘U-shaped’ pattern whereby optimal protective effects were achieved with 3-5 cups of coffee per day.3,4

Drinking 3-4 cups of coffee per day is associated with an approximate 25% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to consuming none or less than 2 cups per day.5 People with diabetes typically have a higher CVD mortality risk, therefore this association may be linked to…

Read full article here –>

Is chocolate healthy for your heart?

mschoice-blog
Hello!
I have some great news about chocolate and its relationship with heart health! Below is an article courtesy of Vending Market Watch suggesting that people who indulge in chocolate can receive many associated health benefits:

 

 

Study: Eating Chocolate Is Good For Heart Health
JUN 19, 2015

Eating up to 100 g of chocolate every day is linked to lowered heart disease and stroke risk, finds research published online in the journal Heart.

There doesn’t seem to be any evidence for cutting out chocolate to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease, conclude the researchers.

They base their findings on almost 21,000 adults taking part in the EPIC-Norfolk study, which is tracking the impact of diet on the long term health of 25,000 men and women in Norfolk, England, using food frequency and lifestyle questionnaires.

The researchers also carried out a systematic review of the available international published evidence on the links between chocolate and cardiovascular disease, involving almost 158,000 people—including the EPIC study participants.

The EPIC-Norfolk participants (9,214 men and 11,737 women) were monitored for an average of almost 12 years, during which time 3013 (14%) people experienced either an episode of fatal or non-fatal coronary heart disease or stroke.

Around one in five (20%) participants said they did not eat any chocolate, but among the others, daily consumption averaged 7 g, with some eating up to 100 g.

Higher levels of consumption were associated with younger age and lower weight (BMI), waist: hip ratio, systolic blood pressure, inflammatory proteins, diabetes and more regular physical activity…

Read full article here —>