Tag Archives: office morale

5 Communication Habits of Highly Successful Leaders

5 Communication Habits of Highly Successful Leaders

Great leaders are heard, and understood. They get the results they want. Here’s how.

When you clearly communicate your vision and objectives to your team, you have certain expectations about the outcome of that communication. Yet, I commonly hear entrepreneurs express concern and confusion over their employees’ inability to carry out a plan to the point of meeting, or exceeding, expectations. If this frustration is familiar to you, it may not be because you’ve chosen the wrong employees, but the wrong approach in communicating with them.

In his recently released book If I Can, You Can: Transformation Made Easy, business coach David Zelman talks about how to communicate so that you are heard–and understood.

“Everyone possesses a unique set of internal conversations,” says Zelman. “Outcomes aren’t based on what your employees are being told, but what they are telling themselves.” In his 40 years of leadership coaching Zelman has learned that everyone’s actions are a perfect match to their inner dialogue and correlated to what they are telling themselves, not what others are telling them. 

If you tell your team that you are slashing the price of an existing product, each person hears something different. Your sales team hears, “Great. More demand, but I’ll have to sell more units to make my financial commitment.” Customer service hears, “Better staff up for additional client base.” And production hears, “How are we going to meet the demand? We are already running at capacity.”

“When another person is speaking, we often don’t do a good job of distinguishing what the other person is saying versus our interpretation of what they’re saying,” says Zelman. “In fact, it is uncommon for us to simply hear what is being said. The point is, if you say something to five people, you are most likely having five different conversations.”

It is possible to create a shared vision within your organization, and to inspire your team to contribute meaningfully. Here are Zelman’s top five suggestions on how to help others transform their inner dialogue and dramatically alter the chance of success.

1.  Have conversations that are focused on the future, not the past.

Getting people aligned on a vision or common purpose is one of the primary roles of a leader. Too many conversations revolve around explaining or justifying why something did or did not get done. This is a waste of time and energy. The past is behind us. Build a practice of focusing on the future, of what needs to happen to achieve the vision and goals. And always establish timeframes in which goals will be achieved.

2.   Instead of issuing directives, have a dialog.

By having employees participate in a dialog that creates goals, strategy, and timeframes, you are encouraging them to have a higher level of ownership of the corporate objectives. Create a collaborative culture and people will assume responsibility willingly.

3.   Don’t assume you have been heard.

Communication requires both speaking and listening. The excuse, “It’s not my fault; I told them what I wanted,” just doesn’t cut it. Unless you ask for feedback, such as, “What’s your interpretation of what I just said?” there is too much room for misunderstanding.

4.   Create a culture of authentic communication.

While transparency and inclusiveness are important variables in establishing effective communication, maintaining integrity in communications is even more so. Organizations must build a culture where people are authentically committed to what they say. A promise is a promise. A commitment is a commitment.

5.   Acknowledge and appreciate good work.

When people are recognized and acknowledged for their contribution, they are more likely to continue to create value in the organization. If you stop acknowledging people, they lose their sense of belonging and making a difference.

Leaders who succeed in sustaining effective communication throughout their organization build high-performing teams and thriving companies. How do you achieve your best results?

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10 Essentials of the Most Successful Companies’ Break Rooms

10 Essentials of the Most Successful Companies’ Break Rooms

Break rooms are an often overlooked feature of the workplace that can actually be counterproductive if used improperly. Break rooms are so named because they’re intended to encourage a mental and physical break from the daily races of the office, but there are many other ways you can make your break room an effective establishment in your workplace. You don’t need to go crazy with upgrades and fixtures, but if you invest in your break room with some major essentials, you’ll see a difference in your employees’ productivity and satisfaction almost immediately. Take these features of successful company break rooms as inspiration.

1. Free coffee. Free coffee is a staple in most offices for a reason. Make sure you have some kind of coffee available in your break room, with all the extras–sugar, cream, cups, and stirrers, at least. Coffee works as a positive incentive for your workers, functioning as an added perk for the job (pun intended). But keeping a flow of coffee is also beneficial for your company’s long-term productivity. Caffeine increases attention spans, improves focus, and boosts mental energy so your workers can work more and feel rewarded while doing so. Plus, coffee is relatively inexpensive, so it’s a small investment for a potentially large return.

2. Lunch tables. No break room is complete without an area for your employees to actually take a break. Lunch tables are important for the obvious reasons: they give people space to sit down and eat a meal during their lunch breaks. But they also serve a more important purpose–they create a natural opportunity for your workers to engage with one another. Those conversations can help to solve existing problems facing those workers, or promote interpersonal connections and a greater sense of teamwork.

3. Differentiation. Don’t make your break room a simple extension of the rest of your office. Do something to make it stand out. For example, you could change the color of the walls or the layout of the room to make the break room feel like it’s a part of a different building. Making this distinction is important because it will allow your workers to fully disconnect from their workspace and decompress. The change in environment will give them a chance to relax and embrace the change in scenery. When they return to work, they’ll start fresh, and productivity will substantially increase.

4. Games. Games are important in the break room for two reasons. First, they give people a chance to unwind and engage in an activity that doesn’t stress them out. It helps relieve stress and promotes greater productivity when the employees go back to work. Second, if you offer a multiplayer game like foosball or billiards, it promotes bonding amongst your workers and leads to a stronger team mentality.

5. Decoration. The break room should be a lively, stimulating place. Don’t keep white walls with a single poster describing workers’ legal rights. Instead, paint the break room a unique color or feature an idiosyncratic pattern. You can also decorate your tables and walls with various items, from motivational posters to community-based bulletin boards. Whatever you do, it’s important to make the break room an interesting place. Otherwise, it will feel like a part of the office, and your workers won’t feel relaxed. Try not to overthink it either–just create an interesting environment that stands out from the rest of the office.

6. Healthy food options. If you want to go the extra mile, include some healthy food options for your workers. Like with the free coffee, your workers will consider it an extra perk of the job, but there are other benefits to offering healthy food in the break room. A healthy snack can curb workers’ hunger without a sharp spike in insulin, which can lead to a crash later. This way, workers can settle their hunger and improve their productivity without resulting in a lethargic mid-afternoon droop. Include options like nuts, whole grains, yogurt, and fresh vegetables if you can.

7. Comfortable seating. Stiff wooden chairs won’t cut it for a successful break room. Comfortable furniture might cost a bit more, but it will also help your workers feel more relaxed and respected. Since your break room is more than just a place to eat lunch, you could even include a couch or two to accommodate workers just looking to relax. Upgrading your furniture may seem like a trivial improvement, but the long-term benefits are significant.

8. Televisions. Televisions are expensive, and for that reason, they aren’t for every business. But if you can afford to put a television or two in your break room, go for it. Keep them at a low volume and restrict the number of channels available to cut down on their potential as a distraction, but televisions can be extremely valuable in entertaining and informing your employees. A steady stream of relevant information, such as national news, helps your workers feel more involved and get more informed about the happenings of the world outside your office. If you can’t have televisions, newspapers may be a suitable alternative.

9. Celebrations. Break rooms should be host to regular celebrations throughout your company, depending on how and when you choose to honor your employees. For example, you could celebrate individual employees’ birthdays in the break room, or save it for recognizing departmental achievements. No matter what types of celebrations you include, make your break room a place people associate with positive experiences. It will add to the relaxing, separated atmosphere of the room and improve the break time your employees have on a regular basis.

10. Requested features. Finally, truly great break rooms have features that have been requested by your employees themselves. There’s no better way to find out what they value than to simply ask them. In your break room, put a comment box that allows employees to submit ideas they have about how to make the break room a better place. Then, incorporate the most valuable suggestions. It will show that you care about their opinions and it will make them happy when you give them what they want (even if it’s something small). If you feel adventurous, you could apply this concept to your entire company.

You don’t have to have the most advanced break room in the world in order to boost productivity and keep your employees happy. However, if you make the effort to create a place where your workers can truly relax and refresh themselves, they’ll reward you with better work and greater satisfaction.

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